Analytical Example For Cv Personal Statement

Analytical Skills List and Examples

Analytical Skills and Keywords for Resumes, Cover Letters, and Interviews

What are analytical skills, and why are they important in the workplace? Analytical skills refer to the ability to collect and analyze information, problem-solve, and make decisions. These strengths can help solve a company’s problems, and increase and benefit a company’s productivity.

Here's information on why employers seek employees with these types of skills, as well as a list of analytical skills that employers are looking for in resumes, cover letters, job applications, and interviews.

Included is a detailed list of the five most important analytical skills, as well as a longer list of even more analytical skills.

Also see below for a list of keywords related to analytical skills, which you can include in your job application.

Why Employers Value Analytical Skills

Employers look for employees with the ability to investigate a problem and find a solution in a timely, efficient manner.

To solve problems, employees need strong analytical skills. Hiring managers desire a person who uses clear, logical steps and excellent judgment to understand an issue from all angles before executing an action. Solutions can be reached by clear-cut, methodical approaches or more creative and lateral angles, depending on the objective. Both of these ways of solving a problem take analytical skills.

Analytical skills might sound technical, but we use these skills in everyday life through detecting patterns, brainstorming, observation, interpreting data, integrating new information, theorizing, and making decisions based on multiple factors and options available.

These essential skills are required by employers for many different types of jobs in a variety of fields, including business analytics, data architecture, data science, marketing, project management, accounting, business development, programming, law, medicine, and science.

How to Use Skills Lists

You can use these skills lists throughout your job search process.

Firstly, you can use these skill words in your resume. In the description of your work history, you might want to use some of these key words.

Secondly, you can use these in your cover letter. In the body of your letter, you can mention one or two of these skills, and give a specific example of a time when you demonstrated those skills at work.

Finally, you can use these skill words in an interview. Make sure you have at least one example for a time you demonstrated each of the top 5 skills listed here.

Of course, each job will require different skills and experiences, so make sure you read the job description carefully, and focus on the skills listed by the employer.

Also review our other lists of skills listed by job and type of skill.

Top Five Analytical Skills

Communication
Having strong analytical skills means nothing if you cannot share your analysis with others. You need to be an effective communicator who can explain the patterns you see in the data. Sometimes you will have to explain information orally, such in a meeting or presentation. Other times, you will have to write a report. Thus, you need to have both strong written and oral communication skills.

Creativity
Often, analyzing requires a creative eye to spot trends in the data that others wouldn’t find.

Creativity is also important when it comes to problem solving. Employees often must think outside of the box to come up with effective solutions to big problems.

Critical Thinking
Critical thinking is necessary for having strong analytical skills. Critical thinking refers to evaluating information and then making a decision based on your findings. Critical thinking is what helps an employee make decisions that help solve problems for the company.

Data Analysis
No matter what your career field, being good at analysis means being able to examine a large volume of data and find trends in that data. You have to go beyond just reading and understanding information, to making sense of it, and finding patterns.

Research
Often, an employee has to first collect data or information before analyzing it. After all, you must learn more about a problem before solving it.

Therefore, an important analytical skill is being able to collect data and research a topic.

Examples of Analytical Skills

A - G

  • Analyzing
  • Auditing
  • Budgeting
  • Calculating
  • Computing
  • Checking for accuracy
  • Classifying
  • Collect information
  • Communication
  • Comparing
  • Compiling
  • Cost analysis
  • Counting
  • Creativity
  • Critical thinking
  • Data analysis
  • Data collection
  • Decision making
  • Deductive reasoning
  • Diagnosis
  • Evaluating
  • Examining
  • Financial management
  • Financial analysis
  • Financial recording

H - M

N - S

  • Organizing
  • Planning
  • Prioritization
  • Problem solving
  • Qualitative analysis
  • Quantitative analysis
  • Research
  • Reasoning
  • Recording facts
  • Research
  • Reporting
  • Resolution
  • Surveying
  • SWOT
  • Synthesizing

T - Z

  • Taking inventory
  • Troubleshooting

Analytical Keywords

Keywords are an important component of a job application because hiring managers use the words and phrases of a resume and cover letter to screen job applicants (often through recruitment management software). By including words that the employer is looking for, you are more likely to make it through to the next round of the hiring process.

Here is a list of analytical keywords for resumes, cover letters and job applications.

A - C

  • Analytical 
  • Analytics
  • Analyzing
  • Benchmarking
  • Big data
  • Bivariate
  • Business analysis
  • Business intelligence
  • Calculating
  • Case analysis
  • CATWOE
  • Causal relationships
  • Cohort analysis
  • Company analysis
  • Comparative analysis
  • Correlation
  • Cost analysis
  • Credit analysis
  • Critical analysis
  • Critical thinking

D - I

  • Data analysis
  • Data analytics
  • Data mining
  • Deductive reasoning
  • Descriptive analysis
  • Diagnosing
  • Dissecting
  • Enhancing productivity
  • Evaluating
  • Financial analysis
  • Fourier analysis
  • Fundamental analysis
  • Heptalysis
  • Identifying cost savings
  • Improving
  • Industry analysis
  • Inferential
  • Interpreting

J - P

  • Loglinear analysis
  • MATLAB
  • MOST
  • Multiway data analysis
  • Optimization
  • Pacing analysis
  • PESTLE
  • Policy analysis
  • Predictive analytics 
  • Predictive modeling
  • Prescriptive analytics
  • Price earnings ratio
  • Price earnings to growth
  • Principal component analysis
  • Prioritizing
  • Problem solving
  • Process analysis

Q - Z

  • Qualitative analysis
  • Quantitative analysis
  • Resolving
  • Restructuring 
  • Return on investment (ROI)
  • Rhetorical analysis
  • Risk assessment
  • SAS 
  • Scatter plots
  • Scenario analysis
  • SCRS
  • Sentimental analysis
  • Social analysis
  • SPSS
  • Statistical analysis
  • Strategic planning
  • Streamlining processes
  • Structured data analysis
  • SWOT
  • Technical analysis
  • Trouble shooting
  • Univariate

Read More:Business Skills List | Research Skills List | Skills Not to Put on Your Resume

Related Articles:Soft vs. Hard Skills | How to Include Keywords in Your Resume | List of Keywords for Resumes and Cover Letters | Resume Skills Lists

by Michael Cheary

OK, so putting a personal statement together is never easy…

But even if you’ve written one before, how you write a personal statement will always depend on your current situation. In other words, what you write as a school leaver will look a lot different to someone who has many years of previous work experience.

To help you find the right one for you, here are some real personal statement examples – and how you can use them to make your CV stand out:

 

Free CV Template

Download Free CV Template

 

University personal statement 

First things first: personal statements aren’t just for your CV.

They’re also a key part of the UCAS application process, and a way to sell yourself to prospective universities. However, they will be much more detailed – and longer – than the one you write for a job application.

We’ve covered everything you need to know about personal statements for university here.

 

School leaver personal statement example

All personal statements should be tailored to the role in question. No exceptions.

Start by answering the following three questions: Why do you want to work in this industry? What skills make you right for the role (hint: use the job description)? And where do you want to go in your career?

However, school leavers should always focus on the latter – and what you can bring to the business, as well as focusing on the knowledge and skills gained through education, rather than employment history. Soft skills are also a great place to start.

Example:

A highly motivated and hardworking individual, who has recently completed their A-Levels, achieving excellent grades in both Maths and Science. Seeking an apprenticeship in the engineering industry to build upon a keen scientific interest and start a career as a maintenance engineer. Eventual career goal is to become a fully-qualified and experienced maintenance or electrical engineer, with the longer-term aspiration of moving into project management.

School leaver CV template

 

Graduate personal statement example

Similar to a school leaver personal statement, but with extra attention paid to specific things you’ve studied during higher education.

Once again, try and explain why you’re applying and where you’d like to go in your career, as well as the specific skills or knowledge you can offer. But try and drop in a few more details on your degree (projected grades are fine), as well as particular modules that have inspired you to work in this profession – if possible.

And remember: a personal statement written for a CV differs greatly from one written for a university application. If you haven’t written one before, you should start by reading our tips on how to write a personal statement.

Example:

A recent business economics graduate with a 2:1 honours degree from the University of X, looking to secure a Graduate Commercial Analyst position to use and further develop my analytical skills and knowledge in a practical and fast-paced environment. My career goal is to assume a role which allows me to take responsibility for the analysis and interpretation of commercial data for a well-respected and market-leading leading company.

Graduate CV template

Unemployed/redundancy personal statement example

Dealing with redundancy is never easy. But when dealt with in the right way, it needn’t be a hindrance when making applications.

Put the main focus on your employment history, and provide further information for your break in your cover letter. You don’t even necessarily need to mention it again, if you’ve already explained it elsewhere.

Remember, your personal statement is intended to sell yourself. So emphasise your positives rather than apologising for a negative.

Example:

Driven Retail Manager with over ten years’ experience in the fashion industry. Proven track record of success, including managing the top performing store in the region, and having the lowest staff turnover rate of all UK outlets. Currently out of work due to company closure, looking for the right opportunity to bring my expertise to a well-established fashion brand in an upper management position.

How to: Deal with redundancy

Redundancy CV template

Career break personal statement example

There are many good reasons someone may need to take a career break.

Some possible examples could include parental leave, caring for a family member, plans to travel or long-term illness. However, whatever the reason for your own break, it’s never something you should feel the need to justify to a prospective employer.

In fact, knowing how to explain a gap in your CV is mostly about confidence. So leave any extra explanation for your cover letter and focus your personal statement on your career before the break – and any skills learned during your time off which may be applicable to the role.

Example:

A highly motivated and experienced PA, currently looking to resume my professional career after dedicating the last five years to raising a family. Excellent admin skills, thorough knowledge of all Microsoft Office programs, as well as proficiency in minute-taking and extensive experience liaising with clients. After volunteering for one day a week with a local charity to refresh my skills, now fully committed to continuing my career on a full-time basis.

Career break CV template

Career change personal statement example

If you’re changing industry completely, think about any transferable skills and applicable to the sector you’re moving into.

Any numbers you can give to demonstrate your success could be crucial – even if you’re moving into an area where your expertise may seem slightly different. So always aim to back up your claims with real examples.

Focus on one or two achievements, demonstrate the impact they had, and you’ll instantly start adding value to your application.

 

Example:

As an experienced sales manager, my tenacious and proactive approach resulted in numerous important contract wins. My excellent networking skills have provided my team with vital client leads, and my ability to develop client relationships has resulted in an 18% increase in business renewals for my current organisation. After eight years in sales, currently seeking a new challenge which will utilise my meticulous attention to detail, and friendly, professional manner.

Changing careers: What you need to know 

Career change CV template

Final thoughts

If you’re still not sure of what to write, don’t panic.

Crafting a winning personal statement will take time, especially if you haven’t written one before. Use these examples as a loose structure to follow, and you’ll be able to add to them as your experience grows.

And remember: you should always aim to edit your personal statement for each role you apply for. That way, you can ensure you’re really selling yourself to their role, rather than simply sending the same generic statement for each application.

It should only take a few more minutes to complete. But if it’s enough to attract an employers interest, it will be time well spent in the long run.

How to write a personal statement

Personal statement dos and don’ts

Read more CV help & tips

 

Still searching for your perfect position? View all available jobs now.

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